SVP of Technical Product Management


Apply for high-paying remote Senior Vice President of Technical Management role. If you want to own the own the architecture and technical direction of a multi-million dollar per year enterprise software product apply now.

Senior Vice President of Technical Product Management

$ 400k/Year  ($ 200/Hour for 40 hours of productive work per week)  Remote Position   Long-term

As a Senior Vice President of Technical Product Management at Crossover, you will make the critical decisions on more products each year than most product and architecture executives will make in a lifetime.

You will mentor and coach a team of VPs, with each one creating an iteration of a different technical specification every seven days. Each week you will draw on your deep technical knowledge across a broad range of domains to simplify and clarify these specifications. You will be responsible for distilling the core functionality of each product and designing improvements to enhance it over future release cycles.

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WHY CROSSOVER?
Crossover recruits and builds world class high performing teams to power the fastest growing portfolio of software products in the world. No other company provides the training and the opportunities to test yourself on the depth and diversity of projects that we do. All roles are location independent so you are guaranteed to work with the best in the world. Challenge yourself. Be part of the change.
 
 
WHAT YOU'LL BE DOING

We acquire a new company and their software products every week.  This results in unparalleled growth opportunities typically only seen in the most explosive startups.

Every one of our Senior Vice Presidents coordinates a team working across many different products each week. The team’s focus is on making design decisions that define the core architecture of each product across multiple future releases.

As an SVP, you will create data structures, object models and algorithms to solve high-value problems at the heart of our products. You will make critical decisions about these products and use your passion for technology to inspire debate.

You will decide when and how to leverage a particular technology and maintain an active, clearly articulated point of view on core technical matters. You will also be open to change and welcome alternative points of view

On a daily basis, you will solve complex, ever-changing problems across a broad and growing product portfolio.

Members of our TPM teams are not typical product managers. They do not spend their time managing engineering teams or planning sprints. Nor do they work long-term on a single project or focus on UI/UX design. As a result, no product management experience is required for this role.

ONLINE HIRING EVENT



A hiring event is a scheduled online event where all our relevant testing relating to a role is conducted on the same day. Submissions received during the event are graded the following week, and successful candidates notified if they have progressed to the next round which is an online interview with a Hiring Manager.

 
 
KEY RESPONSIBILITIES

Each week, you will work across multiple products to:

• Simplify technical design specs that define the core of each product

• Identify relevant design and integration patterns to standardize product requirements and functionality

• Define data structures, object models and algorithms to solve high-value problems

• Make decisions that reduce scope in favor of simplicity

Throughout your time with us, you will:

• Coach and mentor a team of VPs to maintain and improve the quality of level 2 specifications

• Continually learn and leverage new technologies, patterns, practices, and identify use cases for applying them to product designs

• Solve complex, ever-changing problems across a large and growing product portfolio

• Own the creation of simple and clear architecture specs

 
CANDIDATE REQUIREMENTS

Bachelor's Degree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, or Electrical Engineering, (M.Sc. or Ph.D. preferred)

5+ years of hands-on production code development and architecture design in Java or C# on a commercial SaaS product

5+ years experience in a leadership position in Application Architecture, Software Engineering, or Technical Product Management

Have developed and maintained deep technical skills across a variety of technologies and domains

Be able to identify and articulate patterns in unstructured and unorganized content

Have excellent communication skills in written and spoken English

 
 
WHAT YOU WILL LEARN
 

Our investment in you begins with an initial 30 day paid training program.

You will learn valuable fundamental skills around how to interview subject matter experts, determine which ideas are most important, and simplify these in writing as concise technical decisions. We build on these skills throughout the training and learn to combine them effectively to create applicable product specifications. And finally, you will tackle a capstone project under real-world working conditions.

Throughout your training, you will get daily feedback to accelerate learning and growth far beyond typical classrooms or training programs.

Our curriculum includes a number of bite-sized training videos where we explain how we design great software. Here’s an example where we show you how to make and validate Important Technical Decisions.

 
 
 
 

Work Examples

How do you know when and how to apply a particular technology? How can you be sure your shiny new tech isn’t going to stifle your architecture in the long-run?

Here are some playbooks produced by our team members on how to safely and effectively apply two of the latest “big things” in technology

Page 1

Blockchain Decentralized Apps

Playbook for Using a Blockchain dApp Platform Such as Ethereum

Serverless Architecture

Playbook for Using a Serverless Architecture Such as AWS Lambda

If you’d like to create similar playbooks for your own use, please feel free to use our template.

 

Questions
and Answers

  • What does a good technical product manager look like?

    TPMs should be super-technical and great at connecting the CORE of the software's design decisions to the way that those decisions allow the product do the "important thing" in the best way possible. They focus on data structures & algorithms, not slick UI/UX. They write their logic/rationale down so that it can be vetted by healthy debate - or at least understood! They engage directly on the important topics. They spec important product simplifications ("non-features") as often as they spec the “must-have features”.

  • How would you describe a day of work as a VP of TPM at Crossover?

    If I had to describe it succinctly, I would say that the main thing a VP of TPM does each day is to focus on a "thing" that needs a solution. It may be a data structure or an algorithm for a brand new product. It may be how to change an existing codebase to adopt some new technology component that will make the product much better, or retire a bunch of low-value code, or a variety of other problems we are trying to solve. TPMs write down their thinking/logic in the most succinct and clear way possible. They work with other people (global/remote) to ask questions in order to get peer-feedback, and feedback from their manager.

  • How many products does each role manage? What’s the typical size of each product team?

    We don't limit the number of products that TPMs work on in that way. They generally work on one product at a time, and once finished solving that problem/design, they move onto another product. They may come back to a product too. We want TPMs to have continuous learning. By doing this, our TPMs learn many new technologies, design patterns and architectures, industries, and business models. We have designed our organization and processes so that this works. We like people on the team to contribute work and ideas in a fluid manner, in the same way, that great, high-caliber engineering teams all work on many different parts of the same codebase. As long as they are all of sufficient skill, collaborative, and have the right review/approval process, so the code isn't a complete mess. It may be slower in the short-term (because of ramp up) but its better in the long-term. Our engineering teams generally follow the "2 Pizza Rule" regarding size.

  • How are the teams formed within the actual projects and as VP of TPM?
    Would I have any influence over the selection of the project I'd be working on?

    Our view is that TPMs (and the TPM Org) should not focus on managing or influencing the engineering delivery team. We leave that to engineering management. Our TPMs focus on making the important technical decisions that in aggregate define “how the software should work to deliver customer value” and not on “how the engineering team should work to deliver the software.” An analogy would be the way an Architect's job is to clearly define the important decisions regarding the construction of a building but is not part of the building team that the construction company uses to build the building.

  • How do you know what insights are important?

    The important decisions are always there, and they always get made one way or another. The question is whether they are made deliberately and with the gravity they require, or whether you find out how they were made after it is too late. Our process works to identify these decisions early - we invest the necessary time and skill, drive alignment and feedback from all parties, and learn and improve over time. To do this, TPMs must be very technical and able to explain the reasoning for their engineering decisions. TPMs need to see the "big picture" and focus on the important capabilities, not the many minor features. TPMs must be fast learners and great writers and know the difference between controlling what is truly "important" versus micro-managing engineering (which we do not want to do). This is the core of our 30-day CTO Bootcamp process - we, focus on our quality bar, and the goal of our processes.

  • How do you measure success?

    This is a long answer, but the basic idea is that we define actual deliverables for TPMs. These weekly deliverables are quite structured, and we check the quality of the content within those specs. For example, we evaluate how "Important" the content is, how correct the "Technical" content is, and how clear and justified the rationale for the "Decision" is. We call those ITDs, and TPMs get feedback on the quality of their work. So, by measuring the Quality and the Quantity of work, we measure success. In the longer term, we also measure how well those decisions played out in the real world.

  • How does the TPM organization fit within the rest of the organization?

    Our approach to Product Management is heavily technical, and that is because of our belief that the most important thing is mapping the customer problems to a 10x better engineering solution to that problem. We try to simplify and make the core of the product 10x better instead of chasing every little feature that competitors do or developing piles of minor features from the backlog. That said, we also send the core messages to marketing and sales so that they can do their job. Those core messages start with the TPM team.

 
 
 
ABOUT THE ROLE

 
FAQs